Collaboration in Civic Spheres

Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Seattle Science Fest “Open Science” panel coming soon

by Administrator May 30th, 2013

The Seattle Science Festival running June 6 to June 16 will include a special panel discussion June 12 with Q&A, on your right to know what publicly-funded scientists are discovering, and how “open science” can be advanced. The free event is Tuesday June 12, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the West Seattle Branch of the Seattle Public Library, 2306 42nd Ave. SW, just north of Metropolitan Market. More below from panel host Michael Bradbury.


So much science is freely available online if you know where to look. There’s a treasure trove of open science available for journalists, bloggers and the public. Learn about open access journals and other online sources that don’t require subscriptions. Hear about how public data helps tell important regional health and science stories. Join us on June 12 as we listen to some of the stories that local science writers and science social media experts have covered and written in this general discussion of open science.

Sally James brings her years as a science and health writer to bear on open science. She will discuss how she uses social media to access open science papers. She will also talk about how citizen science projects and open science projects have become a staple and how they fit into science writer’s toolbox. She recently started her own blog, SeattleScienceWriter and is former president of the Northwest Science Writers Association. Recently she appeared on KUOW-FM’s Weekday, talking about current science news.

Matt Rosenberg will add to the panel discussion his perspectives covering the Open Science beat for his site Public Data Ferret, a project of the 501c3 he founded and directs, Public Eye Northwest. Matt will share lessons learned mining open access journals online for news of general interest, including that which ties directly into local, regional and state public policy issues.

Michael Bradbury will host the discussion. He is a journalist and the founder of REALscience, a Seattle-based online science news site. He is a longtime proponent of open science who believes that the public should have full access to all research that tax dollars make possible. He would also like to see a proliferation of citizen science projects that engage and encourage the public to help scientists gather and analyze data, further breaking down the barriers between the public and the scientific community.

Please RSVP to info@realscience.us as space is limited. The session is suitable for teens and adults.


MORE: Directions.

Woodinville to OK local wine, beer sales at city park concerts

by Matt Rosenberg April 2nd, 2012

Come this summer in Woodinville, it won’t just be wineries such as Chateau St. Michele reaping the fiscal harvest of concert crowds drawn by the unbeatable combination of smooth Syrah and samba, or Cabernet and cool jazz. The Woodinville City Council is set to give final approval Tuesday night to a resolution green-lighting beverage sales by local wineries and breweries at the city’s revamped summer concert series in its landmark Wilmot Gateway Park. Through it runs the Sammamish River Trail which is used by bikers, joggers and walkers and connects to the Burke-Gilman trail.

Volunteers wanted for Stevens Pass clean-up, Mt. Baker trails

by Matt Rosenberg June 9th, 2011

Stevens Pass Clean-up
On July 12 from 9:30 am to 2 pm join dozens of volunteers from Seattle Parks and Recreation, First Nations Snowboard Team, Washington State University 4-H, and the other organizations to clean trash off the ski slopes at Stevens Pass. A barbeque lunch will follow.The event is organized by the National Forest Foundation. More information and a waiver form to be completed and brought to the event are here. Reserve your spot with Stella Torres, 425-783-6096, storres@national forests.org. Stevens Pass is 78 miles east of Seattle on beautiful State Route 2. Take I-405 north to exit 23 (Highway 522) and exit at SR 2 in Monroe, turning left/east off the exit ramp. Follow Route 2 for 50 miles to the Stevens Pass ski area and park in lot A.

Mount Baker Steward Volunteer Opportunities
Another outdoor volunteer opportunity this summer is to teach wilderness ethics, natural history and safety, as a mountain steward working on the Mount Baker trail system in the U.S. forest Service’s Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. You need to be 18 or older with experience in hiking and outdoor recreation; able to attend training July 16 and 23; and to volunteer a total of three weekend days between July 23 and September 11. Complete the application and return by June 24 to brichey@fs.fed.us, or fax to 360-856-1934. More information: 360-854-2615.

Nooksack River Salmon Talks and Walks
Saturday evenings at 6 pm from July 9 to September 3, the Nooksack River Stewards will present a “Wild About Salmon” campfire talk on salmon and stream ecology, at the Douglas Fir Campground picnic shelter, including snacks of smoked salmon, cream cheese and crackers. The campground is 2.5 miles east of Glacier, Wash. on State Route 542, on the west side of the road just after crossing the North Fork of the Nooksack River near mile post 35.

Sundays at 9 am from July 10 to September 4 the stewards will lead “Noisy Waters: A Nooksack River Walk” on the Horsehoe Bend Trail, on the east side of Highway 542 directly across from the Douglas Fir Campground entrance.

RELATED: Mount Baker- Snoqualmie National Forest.

Stevens Pass stewards, July, 2010/U.S. Forest Service

June 10 screening accents video storytelling, healthy communities

by Matt Rosenberg June 1st, 2011

Get an in-person look 6 p.m. June 10th in the Chinatown Community Center at grassroots videos by South Seattle residents on nutrition and health, which are featured in an innovative digital storytelling public health campaign that will utilize online mapping and collaboration with Seattle neighborhood groups. The videos feature stakeholders from The International District, Georgetown, West Seattle, White Center, South Park, and other South Seattle neighborhoods telling their own stories about starting community gardens, finding youth sports programs for low-income families, green space and exercise, smoking and other prevention and health topics. The June 10 screening coincides with an open house at the center, and refreshments will be provided. There will be Q & A with the video producers and organizers welcome suggestions from attendees on how and where to use the videos in their community outreach effort. Some of the videos are already posted to an interim Vimeo channel and in October 2011 will be available via an online map at the Mapping Our Voices for Equality (MOVE) web page. (It currently re-directs to the interim Vimeo channel).

MOVE is a digital media and health initiative staffed by several Seattle-area non-profits with funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Public Health Seattle and King County. It’s part of a program in King County and 54 other locales nationwide called Communities Putting Prevention To Work, designed by the U.S. Centers For Disease Control, and aimed at obesity and tobacco use among low-income and minority populations. Following are several of the videos.

Mercer Island Urged To Re-Name Community Center

by Matt Rosenberg April 25th, 2011

SUMMARY: The Mercer Island City Council tonight will consider a proposal to change the name of the city’s Community Center at Mercer View to the Mercer Island Community and Event Center. A consultant hired by the city recommends the change, to make more clear to non-local potential renters the facility’s location and its availability for events such as weddings and bar mitzvahs. These play a large role in subsidizing low rental rates of the center for local residents.