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King County Jury Acquits Accused Hospital Rapist

by Matt Rosenberg August 8th, 2013

A Seattle man charged in April of 2011 with raping a woman when they were both patients in the mental health unit of St. Francis Hospital in Federal Way was acquitted this August 1 more than two years later by a jury in King County Superior Court. The acquittal came within less than 24 hours after the three-week trial ended in the Kent courtroom of Judge Suzanne Parisien. When Eddie Lawrence Greadington, 50, was originally charged by King County prosecutors with second-degree rape, the story garnered coverage from local and regional newspapers, plus radio and TV. But though acquittals and other case developments in King County are trackable through free online public records, at this writing Greadington’s exoneration by a jury of his peers has gone otherwise unreported.

Both Had Been Under Duress
Additionally, publicly-available King County audio tapes of the trial reveal through in-session court comments by Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Stephanie Knightlinger the previously unreported details that both Greadington and the alleged victim separately before checking in to the unit had each attempted suicide. In Greadington’s case this was by trying to jump off a bridge. Knightlinger noted the alleged victim had “attempted to take her own life” and was “struggling with her sexuality, having loved a woman” but still feeling love for her husband. Knightlinger at the trial’s close argued Greadington saw the alleged victim “as someone he could prey on” and believed he could “show her what a real man was.”

County prosecutors in the April 2011 charging papers alleged Greadington had on April 25, the day after he was admitted, in a St. Francis mental health unit group therapy discussion room with no one else present, approached the alleged victim, a south King County resident now 40 years old. After making sexually-charged comments, they charged that he threatened to re-open a recent neck artery wound of hers if she did not come with him. He allegedly gripped her hair forcefully and compelled her to come to his private room’s attached bathroom, where the state alleged he anally raped her for five to seven minutes, causing anal bleeding.

Audio-taped Trial Proceedings Reveal Defendant’s Unreported Story
However at trial – particularly under cross-examination by Knightlinger on July 31 – Greadington related a very different version of events. He claimed that the alleged victim had in fact come on to him, exposing her right breast in the group therapy room, then made sexually-charged comments and went to his room, where, he said, she suddenly appeared naked from the waist down in his bathroom and asked him to perform anal intercourse on her, which he did.

Testifying in a voice often loud, angry and impassioned – which prompted repeated warnings from Judge Parisien not to yell – Greadington stressed to the prosecution and to the jury that although he was not even initially interested, the sex did occur but was strictly consensual. He emphasized that he would not lie in court.

Trial audio tapes show that under cross-examination by county prosecutor Knightlinger, Greadington took control and was able to shape his message to the jury very clearly. He concluded in part by stating, “I just an old country boy. I believe in God, and he will serve justice….I wouldn’t sit here in front of this courtroom and all you people and…try to come with something slick….I’m 50 years old and I don’t raise my kids like that. I’m not the greatest father, I can admit that. I’m not the greatest husband, I can admit that. But I ain’t never come in this courtroom and start being no liar….That woman (the alleged victim) didn’t tell you the truth.”

Defense: Burden of Proof Not Met
Greadington’s public defender Dan Pelka emphasized in his closing argument that the prosecution’s burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt “is a high standard” and had not been met. Not only was Greadington’s version of events credible, Pelka asserted, but the documented claim by the alleged victim that she had suffered rectal bleeding as a result of the anal sex was not corroborated by physical evidence; there was no blood on the underwear she put back on after the encounter and an anal swab by hospital staff revealed semen but not blood, Pelka told the jury, citing earlier testimony from hospital personnel.

Pelka added that what transpired was in fact a voluntary and consensual act between two people who were at their “lowest”. It wasn’t advisable, and prompted regrets, Pelka asserted, but it was consensual.

Public Data Ferret’s King County+Courts+Crime archive

The jury recessed to begin deliberations at 2:43 p.m. on July 31 and resumed at 9:08 a.m. the next morning. By 10:58 a.m. they had returned the verdict of not guilty, according to case records. The jury was not individually polled by the judge. Attempts to reach the foreman and the alleged victim were not successful. However, Dan Donohoe, a spokesman for King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg, said, “We felt that this was a case that needed to be heard by a jury. We found the victim’s statement credible. Although we disagree with the verdict, we respect the jury’s decision.”

According to court records, Greadington has prior criminal convictions for unlawful imprisonment, possession of stolen property in the first degree, attempting to elude police, assault in the fourth degree, taking a motor vehicle, theft in the third degree, and three more for criminal trespass in the first degree. The convictions span from 1984 to 2011. His profession is carpentry, according to trial proceedings. His last known address according to court records, is in the 4700 block of 32nd Ave. S. in Seattle.

The rape trial began 26 months after charges were filed. There were numerous continuances granted at the request of Greadington’s attorneys as they sought to prepare his case. At two points during the lead-up to trial, the alleged victim wrote brief notes to the judge, included in the case file, urging no further delays and a prompt start to the trial. The second such note, dated June 6 of this year, read, “this trial has been rescheduled several times. The defendant’s attorney has used every trick in the book. I would like to see some closer (sic) at this point. It has been over two years.” The trial did start the following month.


Public Data Ferret is a news knowledge base program of the 501c3 public charity, Public Eye Northwest. Ferret In The News. Donate; subscribe (free)/volunteer.

Seattle Science Fest “Open Science” panel coming soon

by Administrator May 30th, 2013

The Seattle Science Festival running June 6 to June 16 will include a special panel discussion June 12 with Q&A, on your right to know what publicly-funded scientists are discovering, and how “open science” can be advanced. The free event is Tuesday June 12, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the West Seattle Branch of the Seattle Public Library, 2306 42nd Ave. SW, just north of Metropolitan Market. More below from panel host Michael Bradbury.


So much science is freely available online if you know where to look. There’s a treasure trove of open science available for journalists, bloggers and the public. Learn about open access journals and other online sources that don’t require subscriptions. Hear about how public data helps tell important regional health and science stories. Join us on June 12 as we listen to some of the stories that local science writers and science social media experts have covered and written in this general discussion of open science.

Sally James brings her years as a science and health writer to bear on open science. She will discuss how she uses social media to access open science papers. She will also talk about how citizen science projects and open science projects have become a staple and how they fit into science writer’s toolbox. She recently started her own blog, SeattleScienceWriter and is former president of the Northwest Science Writers Association. Recently she appeared on KUOW-FM’s Weekday, talking about current science news.

Matt Rosenberg will add to the panel discussion his perspectives covering the Open Science beat for his site Public Data Ferret, a project of the 501c3 he founded and directs, Public Eye Northwest. Matt will share lessons learned mining open access journals online for news of general interest, including that which ties directly into local, regional and state public policy issues.

Michael Bradbury will host the discussion. He is a journalist and the founder of REALscience, a Seattle-based online science news site. He is a longtime proponent of open science who believes that the public should have full access to all research that tax dollars make possible. He would also like to see a proliferation of citizen science projects that engage and encourage the public to help scientists gather and analyze data, further breaking down the barriers between the public and the scientific community.

Please RSVP to info@realscience.us as space is limited. The session is suitable for teens and adults.


MORE: Directions.

Cuba smackdown of rights testifier to U.S. Senate backfires

by Zachariah Bryan June 30th, 2012

Earlier this month in Cuba, peaceful political dissident Jorge Luis Garcia Perez, or “Antunez,” was jailed, beaten and pepper sprayed. This took place just three days after he testified to a U.S. Senate subcommittee about the Cuban government’s repression of citizens’ free speech rights. Though for thousands of Cuban citizens such harassment has long been common, acts of repression in Cuba burgeoned last year, according to the Cuba section of a recent global human rights report from the U.S. Department of State. In 2011, The Cuban Commission on Human Rights and Reconciliation counted a total of 4,123 short-term detentions, a 99 percent increase over 2010, according to the State Department report. This year’s pace is even higher, with documented political arrests in Cuba at more than 2,400 since January; 1,158 in March alone, according to testimony of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) at the subcommittee hearing earlier this month.

Documenting witness intimidation by phone – legally

by Matt Rosenberg January 11th, 2012

Since a Washington State Supreme Court ruling in 2008, King County Jail authorities have been able to continue legally recording phone calls made by detainees. County prosecutors say calls by those charged with domestic violence especially can yield valuable evidence. Signs near phone areas warn all detainees their calls will be recorded and potentially incriminating statements may be used against them. This does not always prevent them from instructing their alleged victims not to testify, or threatening them, as shown in a recent episode of the The Justice Files from King County TV.

One in three murders in King County are domestic violence-related, says King County prosecutor Dan Satterberg.

More episodes of The Justice Files here. Also see King County TV’s YouTube channel.

RELATED: King County Senior Deputy Prosecutor David Martin was part of a research team which supervised analysis of recordings of 25 Washington State felony domestic violence detainees using phone calls to try to convince their wives or girlfriends to recant. The article was published in July 2011 in the journal Social Science and Medicine and is titled, “‘Meet me at the hill where we used to park’: Interpersonal processes associated with victim recantation.” The authors conclude that detainees use a common set of emotional tactics to urge recantation and that victim advocates should work to raise awareness among victims of these tactics.

Public Data Ferret’s King County+Courts archive


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Lately, In Transparency – #2

by Kyle Kim July 8th, 2011

To complement the work at Public Data Ferret hub, we’re using the Ferret’s Twitter account to accent news highlights from the world of government transparency, freedom of the press and human rights. Here are some of the most recent finds, for June 28 through July 7, 2011.

The British government releases a trove of data in their new transparency initiative for a more open government. Via The Guardian.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the Brazilian Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota will launch the Open Government Partnership, a “new, multilateral initiative that aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption, and harness new technologies to strengthen governance.” Via the US State Department.

A 164-page report by UN Women is filled with research to support recommendations for eliminating the global gender inequality. The Christian Science Monitor summarizes the report’s 10 key recommendations. In additional UN-related news, UN Human Rights Chief Navi Pillay voiced skepticism on the world’s financial commitment to human rights: “It (funding for UN’s human rights system) is reportedly about the same amount as Australians spend on Easter eggs. It is about the same as the cost of three F-16 jet-fighters. It is one 50th of the 2010 cinema box office revenues in the United States; and the amount Europeans spent on their pets in 2010 alone (Euros 56.8 billion) would fund the entire UN human rights system, including my office, for something like 250 years.”

Public Data Ferret intern Kyle Kim reports how the benefits of Washington State’s initiative for greener buildings are unclear.

Highlighting concerns about concentration of media ownership, critics are voicing sharp criticism over the British government’s approval for Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp to acquire British Sky Broadcasting, the San Jose Mercury News reports.

Politico reported the U.S. Army’s $2.7 billion cloud computing system has hurt more than it has helped the war efforts in Afhganistan and Iraq due to malfunction.

Washington Post:”Radiohead takes tentative step into censored Chinese cyberspace, launches Twitter-like page”

The Texas Watchdog has created a video on how to use open government laws to learn more about education-related issues.

A Texas law is requiring state agencies to post high-value data sets online. The aim is to improve government transparency and civic engagement. Via the Texas Tribune.

Tens of thousands of questions in the form of tweets were sent to President Obama in the Twitter Town Halll event, making him the first president in history to live tweet.

Public Data Ferret intern Melissa Steffan reports how the Washington State legislative audit committee found the state paid $399 million in government negligence, or tort claims from 2004 through 2010.

The White House launched an “engage” page in an attempt to encourage civic dialogue and participation. In the same week, the top White House salaries were released.

The Sunlight Foundation, a government transparency and accountability proponent, reports on how the public has been left out of the American debt ceiling discussion. The organization also covered how two reporters were arrested in a Washington D.C. public meeting.

The Associated Press is to open bureau in North Korea. Via Poynter.

Google’s Transparency Report reveals the U.S government made 54 content removal requests to the company in the second half of 2010.

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