Collaboration in Civic Spheres

Archive for the ‘Parks/Recreation’ Category

“Donut Hole” sale could bring more growth to Maple Valley

by Melissa Steffan August 5th, 2011

The “Donut Hole” is up for sale. And if King County sells it, the City of Maple Valley could become 156.5 acres larger by the end of the year and gain housing and jobs.

It is a somewhat tricky proposition, though. If King County can successfully relocate the regional roads maintenance facility on a land parcel it owns called “the Donut Hole” at 228th Avenue S.E. and S.E. 272nd Street, then new development there could bring more housing, jobs, or both to the City of Maple Valley. Energized by the county’s recent call for qualified developers of the 156.5-acre spread, the city council will hold a public hearing for pre-annexation zoning at its August 22 meeting. The city could annex the property whether or not it is redeveloped, but it must allow the county to keep the roads facility there if a planned new location at the site of the current Cascade Shooting Facilities in Ravensdale does not garner required environmental permits.

Complicating the situation is whether or not developers can step forward, with feasible, well-financed proposals for the Donut Hole. If the King County cannot sell the property, it may have less reason to bear the expense of vacating the land and relocating the roads facility.

Enumclaw finalizes $900,000 public-private funding package for new multi-use sports field

by Kyle Kim July 18th, 2011

SUMMARY: The city of Enumclaw passed an ordinance last week to accept a $300,000 state grant that completes a public-private funding package for a $900,000 project at the Enumclaw Expo Center complex, where a poorly-draining and deteriorated natural turf football field at Pete’s Pool will be replaced with a multi-purpose artificial turf surface. The Recreation and Conservation Office of Washington State awarded the grant conditioned on a double-match amount being raised from other sources. Your Enumclaw Area Stadium (YEAS), the non-profit group in charge of fundraising for the project, has secured the necessary matching funds for the RCO grant, city public works director Chris Searcy said. Slightly more than half, or $325,000 of the $600,000 match required for the RCO grant came via previous grants from the National Football League and King County. The remaining $275,000 of the double-match funding comes from cash donations ($175,000) and in-kind donations of labor, construction equipment and materials ($100,000) Searcy said. The majority of the project’s construction started July 6 and is expected to be finished by August.

Shoreline awards neighborhood matching grant for Sunset Park pARTy

by Andrew Taylor June 29th, 2011

SUMMARY: The Shoreline, Wash. City Council this week approved a mini-grant of $3,942 to the Richmond Highlands Neighborhood Association for a community art project and public event at Sunset School Park. The school has been closed since 2007 and has been vandalized. Combined with complementary funds raised by the association, there will be more than $11,000 to pay for early-phase services and materials to improve the park, including a community artist to lead a September 10 “pARTy at Sunset” community celebration. The event will result in a mural, or fence collage project to boost the property’s public appeal through a five-year period including the school’s demolition. More extensive redevelopment of the site into an open green space and park is expected, under citywide and site-specific parks master plans.

From skunk cabbage to salmon, learning about traditional tribal foods connects youth to a healthy forest

by Administrator June 23rd, 2011

This guest article is authored by Kelly Sprute, Public Affairs Specialist, USDA – Forest Service, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Everett, Wash. office

Eating skunk cabbage leaf salmon or stinging nettle soup doesn’t sound like an entrée at a local restaurant, but Pacific Northwest Native Americans have eaten these foods for centuries.

“I liked the stinging nettle soup but the aftertaste numbed my tongue,” said Samantha James, Ferndale High student and Lummi member. “It felt like my tongue was asleep. I tried to talk but no one understood me,” she said. Samantha learned about nettles and other traditional native foods at the Northwest Indian College in Bellingham, Wash. She enjoyed the salmon wrapped in skunk cabbage, it was juicy and tender, but the leaf stunk.

Samantha James comes across stinging nettles plant while using loppers to clear brush away from Boyd Creek Interpretive Trail/U.S. Forest Service

Samantha’s interest in native foods and heritage led her to participate in the college’s Saturday Science Academy. High school students meet with college students every second Saturday of the month to learn about a science, from physics to astronomy. This month the academy took a trip to Boyd Creek Interpretive Trail on the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest to help open the ADA accessible trail.

Here Samantha and the students did trail maintenance: hacking away encroaching shrubs, brushing off winter debris from the boardwalk and cleaning moss-covered signs; but what they took away was more than sore muscles and blisters. They learned about a healthy forest ecosystem and made another connection to their tribal heritage and the land.

Volunteers wanted for Stevens Pass clean-up, Mt. Baker trails

by Matt Rosenberg June 9th, 2011

Stevens Pass Clean-up
On July 12 from 9:30 am to 2 pm join dozens of volunteers from Seattle Parks and Recreation, First Nations Snowboard Team, Washington State University 4-H, and the other organizations to clean trash off the ski slopes at Stevens Pass. A barbeque lunch will follow.The event is organized by the National Forest Foundation. More information and a waiver form to be completed and brought to the event are here. Reserve your spot with Stella Torres, 425-783-6096, storres@national forests.org. Stevens Pass is 78 miles east of Seattle on beautiful State Route 2. Take I-405 north to exit 23 (Highway 522) and exit at SR 2 in Monroe, turning left/east off the exit ramp. Follow Route 2 for 50 miles to the Stevens Pass ski area and park in lot A.

Mount Baker Steward Volunteer Opportunities
Another outdoor volunteer opportunity this summer is to teach wilderness ethics, natural history and safety, as a mountain steward working on the Mount Baker trail system in the U.S. forest Service’s Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. You need to be 18 or older with experience in hiking and outdoor recreation; able to attend training July 16 and 23; and to volunteer a total of three weekend days between July 23 and September 11. Complete the application and return by June 24 to brichey@fs.fed.us, or fax to 360-856-1934. More information: 360-854-2615.

Nooksack River Salmon Talks and Walks
Saturday evenings at 6 pm from July 9 to September 3, the Nooksack River Stewards will present a “Wild About Salmon” campfire talk on salmon and stream ecology, at the Douglas Fir Campground picnic shelter, including snacks of smoked salmon, cream cheese and crackers. The campground is 2.5 miles east of Glacier, Wash. on State Route 542, on the west side of the road just after crossing the North Fork of the Nooksack River near mile post 35.

Sundays at 9 am from July 10 to September 4 the stewards will lead “Noisy Waters: A Nooksack River Walk” on the Horsehoe Bend Trail, on the east side of Highway 542 directly across from the Douglas Fir Campground entrance.

RELATED: Mount Baker- Snoqualmie National Forest.

Stevens Pass stewards, July, 2010/U.S. Forest Service

Mercer Island Urged To Re-Name Community Center

by Matt Rosenberg April 25th, 2011

SUMMARY: The Mercer Island City Council tonight will consider a proposal to change the name of the city’s Community Center at Mercer View to the Mercer Island Community and Event Center. A consultant hired by the city recommends the change, to make more clear to non-local potential renters the facility’s location and its availability for events such as weddings and bar mitzvahs. These play a large role in subsidizing low rental rates of the center for local residents.